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Report: Timeline for Scotland

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# History: Date History: Place History Full Name
1 142  Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland   The 15th Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius ordered the building of The Antonine Wall in Britain between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde, a distance of 39 miles. Construction took about 12 years to complete. Pressure from the Caledonians may have led Antoninus to send the Empire's troops to bolster its borders further north.  Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius (Antoninus Pius) Augustus, 15th Emperor of the Roman Empire 
2 563  Isle of Iona, Inner Hebrides, Argyllshire, Scotland   Columba was an Irish missionary monk who, some claim, introduced Celtic Christianity to the Picts. In 563 he sailed from Ireland to Scotland where he was granted land on the Isle of Iona.  Columba (Columkille) 
3 Abt 842  Scotland   Alba was the kingdom of the Picts and the Scots (Pictavia and Dál Riata), north of the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde, are traditionally considered to have been unified by Kenneth MacAlpin  Kenneth I(Cináed) MacAilpín (MacAlpin), King of the Picts 
4 1000  Scotland   Ethelred personally leads an expeditions to Scotland to ravage like the best of raiders. A second wave is dispatched to Normandy to give the Vikings a taste of their own medicine.  Ethelred (Æthelred) II'the Unready', King of EnglandEthelred (Æthelred) II'the Unready', King of England 
5 1266  Perth, Perthshire, Scotland   Magnus VI 'the Lawmender' king of Norway considered peace with the Scots more important than holding on to Norwegian possessions off western Scotland and in the Irish Sea. The Treaty of Perth of 1266 left the Hebrides and the Isle of Man to Scotland for 4000 marks and an annual payment of 100 marks. The treaty also confirmed Norwegian sovereignty over Shetland and Orkney. Still, Scottish rule over the Isle of Man was confirmed finally only after the Manx and their last Norse king, Godred VI Magnuson were decisively defeated by the Scots in the 1275 Battle of Ronaldsway  Magnus VI'the Lawmender', King of Norway 
6 Jul 1295  Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   A new panel of Guardians led by Bishop Wishart was established to rule Scotland with John de Baliol as its puppet figurehead. Th Guardians concluded a treaty of mutual assistance with France, which became known as the Auld Alliance. If Edward I was to attack France then Scotland would attack England and vice versa. The following year Edward I attacked France, and the Scots advanced south.  John'Toom Tabard' de Baliol, King of Scots 
7 27 Apr 1296  Spottsmuir, Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland   The Battle of Dunbar (or Spottsmuir) was the first major battle in the First War of Scottish Independence. It was a disaster for the Scots led by king John Baliol. At a single stroke the English led by John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey, had captured one hundred and thirty important knights, and resistance in Scotland rapidly crumbled, as it deprived Scotland of her most experienced military commanders.  Edward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
8 28 Apr 1296  Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland   Sir Patrick Grahame, of Kincardine fought at the Battle of Dunbar on the English side  Sir Patrick de Graham, of Kincardine 
9 10 Jul 1296  Stracathro, Montrose, Angus (Forfarshire), Scotland   Defeated at Dunbar in Aprirl, king John of Scotland abdicates by a deed signed in Stracathro near Montrose. Here the arms of Scotland were formally torn from John's surcoat, giving him the abiding name of "Toom Tabard" (Empty coat), which for Scots represented his real lack of authority as a vassal of Edward I  John'Toom Tabard' de Baliol, King of Scots 
10 Aug 1296  Scotland   During Edward I conquering tour of Scotland in the the summer of 1296, The Ragman rolls, an infamous document in Scotland collected 1900 signatures, including Baliol, Bruce, Stuart also Bishop Wishart agreeing to pay homage to Edward I and forced to affix their seals of submission  Edward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
11 Aft Aug 1296  Glasgow Cathedral, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland   Bishop Wishart persuades William Wallace to take up arms and lead Scotsmen against Edward I  Sir William WallaceSir William Wallace 
12 11 Sep 1297  Stirling Bridge, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   The Battle of Stirling Bridge was a battle of the First War of Scottish Independence. The forces of Andrew de Moray and William Wallace defeated the combined English forces of John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey and Hugh de Cressingham near Stirling, on the River Forth.  Edward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
13 11 Sep 1297  Stirling Bridge, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   William Wallace and Scottish noble Andrew de Moray route the English army trapped in the 'killing field' of ground in the loop of the River Forth. Moray dies due to wounds received in the battle.

Upon his return from the Battle of Stirling Bridge, Wallace was knighted along with his second-in-command John Graham and his third-in-command William Crawford, possibly by the Earl of Carrick, Robert Bruce (the future King of Scotland), and Wallace was named a Guardian of Scotland and Leader of its armies 
Sir William WallaceSir William Wallace 
14 11 Sep 1297  Stirling Bridge, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   Defeated at The Battle of Stirling Bridge by the forces of Andrew de Moray and William Wallace  Hugh de Cressingham 
15 11 Sep 1297  Stirling Bridge, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   Defeated at The Battle of Stirling Bridge by the forces of Andrew de Moray and William Wallace  John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey 
16 22 Jul 1298  Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland   William Wallace fought at and lost the The Battle of Falkirk, against an English army commanded by King Edward I of England  Sir William WallaceSir William Wallace 
17 22 Jul 1298  Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland   The Battle of Falkirk, was a major engagement in the First War of Scottish Independence. An English army commanded by King Edward I of England defeated the Scots under William Wallace. Although he won the battle, Edward lost many men in the battle and was forced to retreat back to England  Edward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
18 Jan 1302  Linlithgow Palace, Linlithgow, West Lothian (Linlithgowshire), Scotland   While wintering at Linlithgow with his son Edward II Edward I agreed to a nine-month truce. Around this time Robert the Bruce along with other nobles submitted to Edward I. Bruce may have found it loathsome to continue sacrificing his followers, family and inheritance for John Balliol. Robert?s father was old and ill and may have wished his son to seek peace.  Edward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
19 11 Jun 1304  Greyfriars Church, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland   Robert Bruce was outwardly loyal to Edward I agreeing the settlement of the Scottish government on 11 Jun 1304 but he was secretly advancing his own ambitions. Bruce and William Lamberton, the Bishop of St. Andrews made a pact in 'friendship and alliance against all men', with a default penalty for either party of £10,000 (the price of silence). They intended to bide their time until the death of the elderly King of England. But the Bruce, beat (and then sent followers to murder) his only opposition, John Comyn in Greyfriars Church, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, an act for which the Bruce was excommunicated. Lamberton absolved him of the crime and made the Bruce swear an oath of obedience to the Scottish clergy.  Edward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
20 Aug 1305  Robroyston, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland   William Wallace is captured in Robroyston  Sir William WallaceSir William Wallace 
21 15 Sep 1305  Kildrummy Castle, Kildrummy, Aberdeenshire, Scotland   Edward I ordered Robert Bruce to put his castle at Kildrummy,"in the keeping of such a man as he himself will be willing to answer for." This suggests Edward suspected Robert was not entirely loyal and may have been plotting behind his back. Bruce, as Earl of Carrick and now 7th Lord of Annandale, held huge estates and property in Scotland and England and had a claim to the Scottish throne.

He would become King Robert I of Scotland by March the following year 
Edward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward I'Longshanks (Longlegs) ,Hammerofthe Scots' Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
22 23/4 Jun 1314  Bannockburn, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   Fought at Bannockburn  Sir Malcolm Drummond, 9th Thane of Lennox 
23 23/4 Jun 1314  Bannockburn, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   Fought at and Knighted on the morning of the 24 June, the day of the main battle of Bannockburn  Sir James'the Goodor Black' Douglas, Lord of Douglas 
24 23/4 Jun 1314  Bannockburn, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   The English had held Stirling Castle for 10 years making it impossible for Robert the Bruce to rule his kingdom.

The Battle of Bannockburn in the First Scottish War of Independence was a decisive victory for King Robert Bruce over the forces of King Edward II.

Following his victory Stirling Castle was surrendered by the English garrison. Robert the Bruce ordered the Castle be destroyed so his enemies could not use it. Robert's son David II Bruce, King of Scots would start rebuilding Stirling Castle in 1356. 
Robert I'the' Bruce, King of ScotsRobert I'the' Bruce, King of Scots 
25 23/4 Jun 1314  Bannockburn, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   King Robert Bruce defeats Edward II's forces at The Battle of Bannockburn  Edward II Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward II Plantagenet, King of England, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
26 23/4 Jun 1314  Bannockburn, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   Humphrey de Bohun should have been given command of the army because that was his responsibility as Constable of England. However, since the execution of Piers Gaveston in 1312 Humphrey had been out of favour with Edward II, who gave the Constableship for the 1314 campaign to the youthful and inexperienced Earl of Gloucester, Gilbert de Clare. Nevertheless, on the first day, de Bohun insisted on being one of the first to lead the cavalry charge. In the melee and cavalry rout between the Bannock Burn and the Scots' camp he was not injured although his cousin (some say nephew) Henry de Bohun(?)*, who could have been no older than about 22, charged alone at Robert Bruce and was killed by the Bruce's axe, an action that would become legendary and incisive to Scots moral and the battles outcome.

* As to the knight being identified as Henry de Bohun, it appears the first instance of this is in John Barbour?s The Brus. Barbour himself was born a year or two after Bannockburn, and wrote the epic poem at age 60, in 1375, for which he received a life pension. In addition, the poem recounting the incident where the Bruce split the helm of the attacking knight, the text has often been translated as the nephew of Humphrey de Bohun:

25 And quhen Glosyster and Herfurd wer
With thar bataill approchand ner
Befor thaim all thar come ridand
With helm on heid and sper in hand
Schyr Henry the Boune the worthi,
30 That was a wycht knycht and a hardy
And to the erle off Herfurd cusyne,

genforum.genealogy.com/plantagenet 
Humphrey VIII de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, 3rd Earl of EssexHumphrey VIII de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, 3rd Earl of Essex 
27 May 1328  Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   May 1328 King Edward III of England signs the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton, which recognised Scotland as an independent kingdom, and Bruce as its king. Part of the contract required Robert's son David (when aged 4) to marry Edward III's sister Joan (aged 7)  Robert I'the' Bruce, King of ScotsRobert I'the' Bruce, King of Scots 
28 Jun 1329  Scotland   Before he died in 1329, King Robert made it his last request that Sir James Douglas, as his oldest and most esteemed companion in arms, should carry his heart to the holy land, and deposit it in the Holy Sepulchre at Jerusalem  Robert I'the' Bruce, King of ScotsRobert I'the' Bruce, King of Scots 
29 30 Nov 1335  Kilblane, Culblean Hill, Ballater, Aberdeenshire, Scotland   The Battle of Culblean took place during the Second War of Scottish Independence. It was a victory for the Scots led by the Guardian, Sir Andrew Murray over an Anglo-Scots force commanded by David of Strathbogie, Earl of Atholl.

Edward Balliol spent the winter of 1335-6, so says the Lanercost Chronicle; ...with his people at Elande, in England, because he does not yet possess in Scotland any castle or town where he could dwell in safety 
Edward III Plantagenet, King of England, Pretence King of France, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of IrelandEdward III Plantagenet, King of England, Pretence King of France, Duke of Aquitaine, Lord of Ireland 
30 1424  Scotland   Alexander MacDonald, King of the Hebrides, Lord of the Isles, together with other Scottish Lords having been persuaded to pay a hefty ransom to Henry VI for his release welcome home James I Stewart who had been held captive for 18 years. Alexander continues to build a Gaelic speaking nation, later acquiring Ross, which comes to James I Stuart's attention  Alexander MacDonald, King of the Hebrides, Lord of the Isles,10th Earl of Ross 
31 1424  Linlithgow Palace, Linlithgow, West Lothian (Linlithgowshire), Scotland   James I Stewart is released after a £40,000 ransome is paid, by Alexander MacDonald and other Lords. James comes home with his new bride and sets about Palace building at Linlithgow. A royal residence rather than a fortress for an educated, renaissance king eager to embrace his place amongst European monarchy  James I Stewart, King of ScotsJames I Stewart, King of Scots 
32 1427  Inverness, Inverness-shire, Scotland   James I Sturat invites Alexander MacDonald to meet at Inverness. Alexander, his family and entourage camp outside. When they enter Inverness, Alexander and his family are roughly set upon.

James I Stuart executes some of Alexander's supporters without trial, then claims the lands of Ross. Alexander is released a few months later but returns to raze Inverness 
Alexander MacDonald, King of the Hebrides, Lord of the Isles,10th Earl of Ross 
33 1429  Holyrood Palace (House), Canongate, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   Alexander MacDonald, King of the Hebrides, Lord of the Isles and Ross, surrenders himself to James I Stuart, he is stripped of his lands and his clothes, humiliated and led away to captivity  Alexander MacDonald, King of the Hebrides, Lord of the Isles,10th Earl of Ross 
34 Sep 1431  Inverlochy Castle, Fort William, Kilmallie, Inverness-shire, Scotland   Alexander's family continue to defy James I Stuart's authority. His followers gather from every corner of the highlands to meet at Inverlochky where they attack the Castle at the Battle of Inverlochy.

900 Royal Stuart troops die and their injured commander flees.

Alexander MacDonald is released a month later with his lands and titles restored. 
Alexander MacDonald, King of the Hebrides, Lord of the Isles,10th Earl of Ross 
35 20 Feb 1437  Friars Preachers Monastery, Perth, Perthshire, Scotland   Angry with James I Stewart's release of Alexander MacDonald which seemed like weakness, James's enemies sought him at Friars Preachers Monastery, Perth. James tried to escape through its sewers but was trapped and stabbed to death. An act of regicide undertaken on sacred ground.  James I Stewart, King of ScotsJames I Stewart, King of Scots 
36 1446  Rosslyn Chapel, Roslin Glen, Roslin (Rosslyn), Midlothian, Scotland   Founded Rosslyn Chapel 150 years after the dissolution of the Knights Templar and it is claimed its layout echoes that of Solomon's Temple. The Chapel took 40 years to build, Sir William, 11th Baron did not see its completion.  Sir William Sinclair, 1st Earl of Caithness, 11th Baron of Roslin, Prince and 3rd Earl of Orkney 
37 22 Feb 1452  Stirling Castle, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   James II Stewart's dominion was hemmed in by John MacDonald in the highlands and Islands and Earl William 'Black' Douglas who ruled the Borders in the South, both had a friendship pact, which James saw as a conspiracy.

Earl Douglas was invited to Stirling Castle in 1452 and only turned up after he had a letter guaranteeing his safety. Over dinner when the Earl refused to side with his king, James II drew his dagger and stabbed William Douglas. Throwing him out of the window, his body was later found to have 26 stab wounds and his skull split by an axe. James seized William Douglas's lands.

This was bad news for John MacDonald who in 1460 agreed to fight for James II in France. But, he didn't have to because later that year James II died in an accident. 
James II'the Fiery Face' Stewart, King of ScotsJames II'the Fiery Face' Stewart, King of Scots 
38 1480  Bloody Bay, Sound of Mull, Isle of Mull, Inner Hebrides, Argyllshire, Scotland   When James III Stewart was just a boy king, Edward IV of England invited John MacDonald of the Isles and the Douglas clan deposed of the Borders to back a rebellion and share the spoils of Scotland, as long as they both swore overlordship to Edward.

John's illegitimate son Angus Og pressed his father to sign so that he could claim taxes due.

However Edward found he didn't need them and when James III found out about the pact, John surrendered, a humiliating submission, just as his father had done.

This led to Angus Og fighting his father at Bloody Bay. Angus won but the Gaelic dynasty faded and was thereafter looked upon as outcast and traitorous. Angus would later be strangled by his sevant 
John MacDonald, Lord of the Isles, 11th Earl of Ross 
39 09 Sep 1543  Stirling Castle, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   When Mary Stewart was 6 months old, The Treaties of Greenwich declared that she would marry Edward Tudor in 1552 and for their heirs to inherit the Kingdoms of Scotland and England. Edward's father Henry VIII had recently broken with with the Catholic faith and was expecting threats from Europe with Scottish support under the Auld Alliance. So the marriage would ensure Scottish alliegance. Mary's mother was opposed to the proposition, she hid Mary at Stirling Castle and had her crowned Queen on 9 Sep 1543 aged 9 months.

Under the ordinary laws of succession, Mary was next in line to the English throne after her cousin, Elizabeth (who would remain childless). In the eyes of many Catholics, Elizabeth was illegitimate, having been born 8 months after her mother, Anne Boleyn's marriage, thus making Mary the true heir as Mary II of England. However the Third Succession Act of 1543 provided that Elizabeth would succeed Mary I of England to the throne 
Mary I Stuart, Queen of ScotsMary I Stuart, Queen of Scots 
40 10 Sep 1547  Pinkie Cleugh, Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   The Treaties of Greenwich soon fell apart after Mary's coronation and Henry VIII set about 'Rough Wooing' to impose the marriage to his son, applying a series of raids, including devastating Melrose Abbey, until 1551 costing £500,000 and many lives. But Mary remained in the secret chambers of Stirling Castle.

On 10 Sep 1547, known as 'Black Saturday', the Scots suffered a bitter defeat at the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh. Mary of Guise, fearful for her daughter, sent her temporarily to Inchmahome Priory, and turned to the French for support.

The new French King, Henry II proposed uniting France and Scotland and by Mary's right, a back door to securing England, a Western European Catholic Empire, by marrying Mary to his 3 year old son, the Dauphin François. The marriage treaty was signed at a nunnery near Haddington. On 7 Aug 1548, Mary sailed from Dumbarton to France. 
Mary I Stuart, Queen of ScotsMary I Stuart, Queen of Scots 
41 10 Sep 1547  Pinkie Cleugh, Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   Knighted at the battle of Pinkie on 10 Sep 1547  Sir Edward Seymour 
42 19 Aug 1561  Leith, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   Mary I Stuart returned from France to Edinburgh's port of Leith. Scotland had changed, the reformation had spread to Scotland and it was now a protestant country. The Calvinist (from the French reformer John Calvin) John Knox, Scotland's spiritual leader considered Catholic monarchs could be deposed. Mary's catholic half brother advised her to keep her religion private but work with protestant regime, but at her first private mass, the secret was discovered by a mob. John Knox said that 'one mass was more fearfull than 10,000 men'. Knox was brought before Mary where she told him Scotland could remain protestant but she would remain catholic. She then toured Scotland to win over its people.  Mary I Stuart, Queen of ScotsMary I Stuart, Queen of Scots 
43 1564  Holyrood Palace (House), Canongate, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   By 1564 Elizabeth had not produced an heir, so Mary I Stuart decided to take the initiative, re-marry and produce an her for the English throne. She considered as suitors the French adolescent brother of her dead husband, Hercule François Duke of Anjou or the elderly Spanish widower, the Holy Roman Emperor Carlos of Spain. She decided upon her English cousin (their grand mother was Margaret Tudor), Henry Darnley who was tall, good looking, and young a boy who could be her king.  Mary I Stuart, Queen of ScotsMary I Stuart, Queen of Scots 
44 1566  Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   While Mary I Stuart was pleased to be pregnant, her husband Henry Darnley became drunk and debauched and probably suffered from syphilis. A plot was hatched to be rid of him.

At a 'Round Table' party thrown to celebrate James V Stuart's baptism at Stirling Castle, Mary announced that her 'Little King Arthur' would be the future ruler of the British Isles, much to the chagrin of the English ambassador.

On 10 Feb 1567, Henry Darnley's house at Edinburgh's Kirk o' Field (Kirk is Celtic for Church) is blown up, and he is found in its garden strangled. Henry's body, practically a king of Scotland is left at Holyrood Chapel were no gravestone lays monument. 
Mary I Stuart, Queen of ScotsMary I Stuart, Queen of Scots 
45 24 Apr 1567  Stirling Castle, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   On 24 Apr 1567, Mary I Stuart visited her son at Stirling for the last time. On her way back to Edinburgh Mary was abducted, willingly or not, by James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell (a ringleader in Darnley's murder) and his men and taken to Dunbar Castle, where she was allegedly raped and mentally destroyed by Hepburn. She became pregnant with twins. On 6 May 1567 they returned to Edinburgh and on 15 May 1567 was married at a protestant service at Holyrood Palace.  Mary I Stuart, Queen of ScotsMary I Stuart, Queen of Scots 
46 Jun 1567  Loch Leven Castle, Castle Island, Loch Leven, Kinross-shire, Scotland   Protestant forces rise to unseat Mary I Stuart. On Carberry Hill battlefield Earl Bothwell is allowed to escape when Mary offers herself for captivity at Loch Leven Castle. Between 18 Jul and 24 Jul 1567, Mary miscarried her twins. On 24 Jul 1567, she is forced to abdicate the Scottish throne in favour of her 1 year old son James.

On 2 May 1568, Mary escaped from Loch Leven and again managed to raise a small army. After a defeat at the Battle of Langside on 13 May 1567 she flees to England 
Mary I Stuart, Queen of ScotsMary I Stuart, Queen of Scots 
47 29 Jul 1567  The Church of the Holy Rude (Holy Cross), Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland   James VI Stuart coronation was the worst attended in Scottish history. The protestant service was conducted by the Calvinist John Knox who had spent time studying under Calvin in Geneva, and is considered the founder of the Presbyterian denomination.  James VI(James I) Stuart, King of Scotland, England and IrelandJames VI(James I) Stuart, King of Scotland, England and Ireland 
48 1573  Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   Present at the storming of Edinburgh  Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter, 2nd Baron Burghley 
49 Abt 1579  Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland   At the age of 37 Esmé Stewart is introduced to the 13 year old James VI of Scotland when James made his formal entry into Edinburgh. Esmé was first cousin of James's father Lord Darnley and had catholic sympathies and influence over James.  James VI(James I) Stuart, King of Scotland, England and IrelandJames VI(James I) Stuart, King of Scotland, England and Ireland 
50 1579  Scotland   The very first Bible printed in Scotland was the Geneva Bible, which was first issued in 1579. In fact, the involvement of John Knox and John Calvin in the creation of the Geneva Bible made it especially appealing in Scotland, where a law was passed in 1579 requiring every household of sufficient means to buy a copy.  Mary I Stuart, Queen of ScotsMary I Stuart, Queen of Scots 


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